Frequently Asked Questions


Your privacy on the Internet is of the utmost importance to us!

Privacy Statement

This privacy statement describes our policy concerning the gathering and sharing of visitors’ information through our web site. It applies to all “our sites” – that is, within the “dengaterfoundation.org & lostboysschoolsforsudan.org” domain names. You should note that, through this site you may reach or be directed to other sites that relate to our effort.

Such as, sites like our local, national or international partners (the various private charities around the world whose job is to support the Deng Ater Foundation); all these sites have their own privacy statements which are similar to this one but may vary slightly. By visiting the our website you are accepting the practices described in this policy.


Privacy Policy

  1. What information does the Deng Ater Foundation collect?
  2. What does the Deng Ater Foundation do with the information it collects?
  3. Contact.
Situation In Southern Sudan

  1. How bad is the educational infrastructure in southern Sudan?
  2. Do girls have equal access to education as boys?
  3. What is the adult literacy rate?
  4. Are there qualified educators available to teach?
  5. How many schools exist and are the facilities adequate for children?
  6. What are the health issues facing children?
  7. Does peace in the region continue to hold?
About Lost Boys Schools

  1. Who owns Lost Boys Schools?
  2. Will Lost Boys Schools be free?
  3. Will Lost Boys Schools be public or private?
  4. In which geographical areas will Lost Boys Schools be built?
  5. Where will Lost Boys Schools get teachers?
  6. Will the local communities be involved in the decision making and construction of process of all Lost Boys Schools?
  7. What curriculum will Lost Boys Schools adopt?
  8. Has the Deng Ater Foundation received a tax exemption determination letter?
  9. Has the Deng Ater Foundation received an OFAC license to conduct activities in southern Sudan?
  10. Is the Deng Ater Foundation registered as an indigenous Non Governmental Organization (NGO) with the South Sudan Relief & Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC) and the Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS)?

Privacy Policy

Q:1 What information does the Deng Ater Foundation collect?

Normal Website Usage

In general, you can browse our site without telling us who you are or revealing any personal information about yourself. The only information we gather during general browsing is from standard server logs. These include your IP (Internet Protocol) address, domain name, browser type, operating system, and information such as the web site that referred you to us, the files you downloaded, the pages you visit, and the dates/times of those visits.


Collection Of Personally Identifiable Information

If you register for a newsletter, order merchandise, request information, provide feedback, join a discussion group (BLOG) or join an electronic mailing list, you will be asked to provide personal information such as your name, postal address, phone number and e-mail address. This information is collected only with your knowledge and permission, and is kept in our databases. If you are purchasing something or donating on the web, you may be asked to provide your credit card details.

For our site, registering or supplying personal information sets a *Cookie. By setting this cookie, we will remember your details the next time you visit, so you don’t have to re-enter the information. This helps us to provide you with a better service.

Joining electronic discussion groups (BLOGS) may mean that other participants of the discussion group (including non-Deng Ater Foundation representatives) will see personal information that you have volunteered. For open discussion groups, (BLOGS) this information will be public.

Q:2 What does the Deng Ater Foundation do with the information it collects?

Normal Web Usage

The information gathered during general browsing of a “dengaterfoundation.org & lostboysschoolsforsudan.org” domain is used to analyse trends and usage of our site and to improve the usefulness of the site. It is not connected with any personal information. However, if you have registered with us in connection with any activity on our site, the information we collect about your normal web usage will be identifiable to you.


Personally Identifiable Information

The Deng Ater Foundation may use the personal information you provide to:

  • Contact you – either in response to a query or suggestion, or to mail newsletters, documents, publications, etc. to you, and we also may provide the information to the our national committees so they can contact you as well.

  • Manage and process your job application.

  • Confirm your purchases and registrations on the site.

  • Obtain payment for purchases through the site (via credit card).

  • “Remember” your online profile and preferences.

  • Help you quickly find information that is relevant to you based on your interests, and help us create site contents most relevant to you.

  • Undertake statistical analysis.


What If I Don’t Want To Provide Personal Information?

Providing personal information on our web site is optional. If you choose not to provide personal information, you can still browse and use our site, but you will not be able to carry out certain actions such as purchasing merchandise, donating, registering for a newsletter, request information, provide feedback, joining a discussion group (BLOG) or applying for a position.


Opting Out & Changing Your Information

At any time, you can cancel or modify your information by returning to the web page where you first provided the information and contacting the focal point for that page/relevant department. Where contact details are not provided on the page, you can contact us for further information.


Security

We do not sell or share any personally identifiable information volunteered on our site to any third party without prior consent. We do, however, share some user information with our national committees so that the whole Deng Ater Foundation family can respond to your needs. Any information provided to us by users of our site is held with the utmost care and security, and will not be used in ways other than as set forth in this privacy policy, or in any site-specific policies, or in ways to which you have explicitly consented. We employ a range of techniques and security measures to protect the information maintained on our system from loss, misuse, unauthorized access or disclosure, alteration, or destruction.

However, we assumes no responsibility for the security of information.

Our site contains links to sites external to the “dengaterfoundation.org & lostboysschoolsforsudan.org” domain. We are not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such sites.


Notification Of Changes

Changes to this privacy policy will be posted here and will be available via our Home Page at:

http://lostboysschoolsforsudan.org & http://www.dengaterfoundation.org.

Q:3 Contact Us

For questions or queries regarding this privacy policy, please Contact Us choosing the topic ‘privacy’ or contact us by mail at; P.O. Box 14691 - Tucson, Arizona 85732-4691 - U.S.A. Please report any errors, broken links or suggestions about this web site to the Webmaster.

Copyright © 2008 Deng Ater Foundation - Lost Boys Schools For Sudan. All rights reserved.


A *cookie is a small amount of data that is sent from the web server to your browser. It is normally used to assign a unique identification to your computer and securely store information such as user IDs, passwords, preferences, and online profiles. It is stored on the hard drive of your computer. You can choose not to have cookies delivered by our site by changing your browser settings. Different web sites can send their own cookies to your computer. To protect your privacy, your browser only allows a web site to access the cookies it has already sent you, no the cookies sent by other sites.

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Situation In Southern Sudan

Q:1 How bad is the educational infrastructure in southern Sudan?

Children in southern Sudan have the least access to primary education in the world. The net enrollment ratio in primary school is the worst in the world.

In terms of primary school completion, southern Sudan has the lowest rate worldwide. Only one out of every 50 children finishes primary school. [UNICEF]

Q:2 Do girls have equal access to education as boys?

Southern Sudan has the lowest ratio of female to male enrollment. In other words, only one out of every five children of school age is in class and around three times more boys than girls are at school.

With a population of 7.5 million, only 500 girls finish primary school each year while 2,000 boys finish. The share of cohort reaching grade 5 is the least in the world. [UNICEF]

Q:3 What is the adult literacy rate?

Southern Sudan is second in terms of worst adult literacy rate in the world. Three out of every four adults are illiterate and about one of every ten female adults is literate. [UNICEF]

Q:4 Are there qualified educators available to teach?

The 'misleading' teacher-to-pupil ratio (1/33) is better than other countries in the region, but far less than that of the rest of Sudan.

Only 7% of the teachers are trained in the sense of having received at least one year of pre-service training. Of the 93% of teachers having received less than a year of training, half of teachers had no training at all and the other half have received from two weeks to a few months of in-service training.

And to underscore the discrimination against women, only 7% of the teachers are female. [UNICEF]

Q:5 How many schools exist and are they adequate for children?

Only 1,600 schools exist for the 1.6 million children of school age, only 10% of the classrooms are in permanent buildings, 80% of the children have no bench to sit on and only one third of the schools have access to latrines and half have access to safe clean water. [UNICEF]

Q:6 What are the health issues facing children?

About one in ten Sudanese children dies before the age of five. Malaria, acute respiratory infections and diarrheal diseases kill more than 100,000 children annually.

Conditions for women and children are dire in Southern Sudan. The region’s maternal mortality rate is estimated to be about three times as high as in the rest of the country.

More than 20 million people lack access to sanitation; 17 million have no source of safe drinking water.

Thousands of children who were once recruited as soldiers or were otherwise associated with armed groups now need assistance in reintegrating with society.

More than 2 million people rely on food assistance. Less than 1 per cent of households use iodized salt, contributing to a goiter rate of 22 per cent. [UNICEF]

Q:7 Does peace in the region continue to hold?

With the signing of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Accord (CPA) and the hopeful political settlement of the Sudanese conflict in Darfur looming, several humanitarian organizations have since become involved and tasked with the repatriation of thousands of people from refugee camps in the neighboring countries and from the internally displaced populace as well.

Peace in the south continues to hold, but the northern government has failed to honor the Comprehensive Peace Accord (CPA), rebel clashes still continue and violence in the southern regions is sporadic, as hope for success in the northern Darfur region at the most recent peace talks are high.

As of 2005 peacekeeping troops have struggled to stabilize the region. Estimates place the death toll at more than 500,000+ and also more than another 4+ million have been displaced to date. In 2006 the Darfur Peace Accord (DPA) was signed and in 2007 an agreement to send in an additional 20,000 United Nations (UN) personnel to support the African Union (AU) force was reached, bringing the total commitment to 26,000. Violence continues to plague the region and April of 2007 was the bloodiest month for the African Mission in Sudan (AMIS) since 2004. As of January of 2008 the UN has failed to deploy its personnel and only 9000 AU troops have been deployed in the region and most are under equipped African units.

Many of The Lost Boys, now men, since the signing of the 2005 CPA, have begun to return to southern Sudan for the first time in over 20 years to help rebuild their communities and begin the peace and reconciliation process. They hope the people of southern Sudan will gain autonomy from the north through secession in 2011, which will finally put an end to all hostilities, and thus reach a final peaceful resolution between the Northern and Southern Governments of Sudan once and for all…

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About Lost Boys Schools

Q:1 Who owns Lost Boys Schools?

All Lost Boys Schools are owned by the Deng Ater Foundation. The school board is comprised of local community leaders, the school principal and local officials, will administer the schools and develop policies to sustain the schools after three years.

Q:2 Will Lost Boys Schools be free?

The Deng Ater Foundation will financially support its schools for a limited time. It is our expectation that each school will be equipped and supported for three years, after which time the school will operate on its own and generate its own income. We have adopted a model for our schools that will make them self-sustaining after several years, allowing them to continue without needing much, if any, financial assistance from our organization.

Students who are able to do so will pay registration fees and tuition, plus room and board if applicable. The schedule of fees per a year will be determined by the school board, based on a students’ ability to pay. A combination of reduced fees and scholarships will be made available to the disadvantaged youth, including orphans, returning refugees, former child soldiers, and young women.

Q:3 Will Lost Boys Schools be public or private?

All Lost Boys Schools are privately funded public schools. They will operate based on the income that will be generated by the schools. The income that will be generated by the schools will be used to sustain and improve the schools and to support graduates through various programs, including micro loans.

Q:4 In which geographical areas will Lost Boys Schools be built?

All Lost Boys Schools will initially build it schools in the townships of Mareng -2008/2009, Duk Faiwil -2009/2010, Duk Fadiat –2010/2011, in Duk County, within the state of Jonglei in the Upper Nile River Valley of southern Sudan.

Our future objectives are to build an additional 50 schools by 2022 throughout southern Sudan over the next 10 years, beginning in 2011 using the same business model.

As southern Sudan is made up of 10 states, each of which will initially get three schools. There will also be three schools built in each of the most marginalized areas. The remaining schools will go to the areas determined by most need.

Q:5 Where will Lost Boys Schools get teachers?

Our team is committed to finding and hiring the best teachers in southern Sudan, and will help Sudanese teachers living abroad to return home to educate the next generation of leaders at Lost Boys Schools.

We want to ensure that our schools have the most qualified teachers available, and may get teachers from bordering countries like Kenya or Uganda for our first schools until Sudanese teachers return and are available to teach.

Americans teachers will be encouraged to volunteer in Lost Boys Schools and will be able to apply for temporary teaching posts. The foundation of Lost Boys Schools is based on the idea of Sudanese and Americans people working together, as well as learning from each other by promoting peace by providing literacy through education throughout southern Sudan.

Q:6 Will the local communities be involved in the decision making and construction of process of all Lost Boys Schools?

Our team will work collaboratively with the local communities to participate in all aspects of the Lost Boys Schools construction and development.

The community will be informed from the very beginning that they will create the schools with the Deng Ater Foundation, who will act as the implementing partner. Each individual community's needs will be assessed and addressed by our team and community partners, using a basic successful model for development.

Q:7 What curriculum will Lost Boys Schools adopt?

All Lost Boys Schools will adopt the curriculum of southern Sudan, but will also provide specialized vocational training to students. Several Lost Boys academies will also have a specialization in the following fields: health sciences, teacher training, sustainable agriculture, business, government, and technology.

In addition to the regular high school curriculum, there will also be additional courses provided in peace studies, conflict transformation and gender studies. All Lost Boys Schools will also emphasize extra-curricular activities such as sports and social events, including opportunities for experiential and service learning.

Q:8 Has the Deng Ater Foundation received a tax exemption determination letter?

Yes.

Non-Profit Articles of Incorporation were filed on the 14th of September 2007 at the Arizona Corporation Commission and approved on the 11th of October 2007.

Non-Profit Articles of Incorporation were published in the Ajo Copper News in the State of Arizona on December 19th, 26th of 2007 and January 2nd 2008. The Arizona Corporation Commission received the Affidavit of Publication on the 9th of January 2008.

The foundation sought conditional approval of tax exempt status and the Application for Recognition of Exemption under section 501c3 of the Internal Revenue Code, form #1023, was filed on the 10th of January 2008.

The foundation received its tax exempt status on October 10th, 2008, under section 501(c)(3), as a public charity, under section 170(b)(1)(A)(vi), retroactive and effective as of September 14, 2007.

  • Exemption Determination Letter. [pdf]

Q:9 Has the Deng Ater Foundation received an OFAC license to conduct activities in southern Sudan?

No.

The foundation has not yet applied for the OFAC license.

This license will not be needed until December of 2009 as our immediate intention is to provide public healthcare prevention and education campaigns to relieve human suffering, conduct 3 site surveys, and register with the SSRRC & GOSS.

The rules make clear that Americans doing religious or humanitarian work in Sudan may pay for the ordinary costs of traveling and living there, including lodging, food, transportation, and similar items. 31 C.F.R. § 538.211(d) (travel expenses)

Americans may donate tangible articles of food, clothing and medicine intended to relieve human suffering in the Sudan, and arrange for their shipment to Sudan. 31 C.F.R. § 538.211(b).

Hand-carried cash transfers to Sudanese ministries or individuals are subject to U.S. currency reporting requirements only if they are $10,000 or more. Bank Secrecy Act, BSA, 31 U.S.C. § 5316 (2002)

We do not anticipate that any of the above related issues will affect the efforts of our Immediate Impact Initiative during the December 2008/January 2009 trip.

  • OFAC License For Sudan Activities. [pdf]

Q:10 Is the Deng Ater Foundation registered as an indigenous Non Governmental Organization (NGO) with the South Sudan Relief & Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC) and the Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS)?

Our team will be returning to southern Sudan to register as an indigenous Non Governmental Organization (NGO) with the South Sudan Relief & Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC) and the Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS) in December 2008/January 2009.

  • SSRRC Registration Letter. [pdf]
  • GOSS Registration Letter. [pdf]

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